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By Forester
#401873
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I swear, I'll never bother with studio lighting ever again!

The above is lit with HDR image "Little Paris Eiffel Tower 4K" from Polyhaven. Still a WIP - four more boats under development, and one more background building.




Here is another shot of the bigger cargo boat being unloaded. HDR image is " Acoustical_Shell" 4K, also from Polyhaven. Here I needed a more diffuse light so that I could check the details of the models.

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Last edited by Forester on Sat Jun 22, 2024 2:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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By Mark Bell
#401874
Hi Forester,

Thanks for posting the renders. Like you, I've also found using IBL's create a better image. The other things to experiment with, which I've noticed add more realism, is the f-stop and camera settings (determined on whether it is an interior, exterior and bright or dull day etc.), and the type of photographic film used (results will vary depending on the IBL used). I like your attention to the details and the mountain range in the background looks really good. The water in the bottom image looks a bit choppy :-)
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By Forester
#401875
Hello Mark! Very good tips about the camera settings. I'll experiment with those. Thanks for adding that information. And,yes, thanks for pointing out the choppiness of the water. These are still just preliminary renders. Still a heavy load of model-building to complete for this set.
By Andreas Hopf
#401886
For most product photography, classic 3-point photo studio light emitter set-ups (or other typical set-ups) have the great advantage that you can adjust each emitter in Multilight later, sparing you from re-rendering, which you cannot do with the IBL lighting method, where only one light-source, the HDR image, can be adjusted. Even outdoor product photography (lawnmower, cargo bike, outdoor apparel, etc.) in a more dramatic morning or evening setting benefits from one or two emitters as fill lights in addition to IBL. Just look at how things are set up in real product photography, still the best guide for good lighting - for any render engine.
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By Mark Bell
#401887
Hi Forester,

Thanks for posting more of your WIP. I sense there's a story going on here - a lot of detail in your modelling in recreating historic settings. I like the way the scene composition in the top image is coming together. Most of my time is in design not rendering so when I do get back onto Maxwell I have to remind myself to use it like a camera for best results. You might have a look at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao example project in the File/Library/Scenes folder in Studio as it includes the model, textures, lighting and camera settings for an overcast and a sunny day so you can play around to experiment and see how the changes affect the render. That scene helped me to better understand how f-stop and EV/exposure value can be used to improve a render in either low light or one with strong sunlight in combination with the right ISO and shutter speed. Another realisation I've noticed in my own renders is much of the subtle detail and lighting comes out once the SL gets up around 17-18 or higher for architectural scenes. I use Resume Render and have the render set at slow allowing me to continue to use the computer for other work whilst it renders in the background, a feature I think is unique to Maxwell?
....looks like you're having some fun with this project~!
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By Forester
#401896
Another one from the same project. This is an older, smaller boat - a short distance cargo ship, the last of six for the project. Here, I was simply running a test to check on the sails. (The smaller one still is a failure after four tries. Maya hates the geometry for some unknown reason.) But the lighting still looks good. Still the same HDRI image. No change at all to the basic lighting setup. Right Click on the render to open it up in another tab.
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